The history of the workplace and how it’s managed is fascinating. Since the beginning of free enterprise, in particular, management theories have increasingly favored participation by employees at all levels of the organization.

Think of employees – all employees – as decision makers. Outside of the workplace, they make decisions on an ongoing basis. Where to live, what type of car to buy, what to eat, with whom to form relationships and how to raise our children are just a few of the high-level decisions we make. So then if an employee inside a workplace is told to “Just do what I tell you and how I tell you to do it,” they’re not going to feel management thinks they are smart and capable.

Many first-time managers make this rookie error. Excited about the opportunity to be in charge, they tend to over-manage (or micromanage) and it works against them. The best ideas, in fact, generally come from the folks actually performing the tasks associated with the job. While the first-time manager may have been mulling better ways to do things for a long time and therefore looks forward to the new opportunity to “bark orders,” it won’t be effective in the long run.

Chances are if a new manager – or any manager – feels inclined to demand “my way or the highway,” it’s because s/he didn’t feel listened to as a member of the staff. The best way for that new manager to make sure he is well-respected and looked up to, then, is for him to break the cycle of telling instead of listening to and supporting others’ ideas.

Don’t get us wrong: listening and supporting doesn’t always mean accepting others’ ideas and running forward with them. The manager is accountable for the overall business plan and therefore has to make sure every idea is vetted from all angles. If it’s accepted, then implementation has to be thoughtful and detailed, bringing along all the folks that weren’t involved in the decision at the beginning.

The point is that if you’re still running your organization with that strictly top-down management theory, you’re about 70 years out of date. Try to loosen the reins and find ways to dialog with employees so that all great ideas – management and non-management – are on the table and open to discussion.